Stem cell therapy shows potential to heal intestinal disease in premature infants.

 

WINSTON-SALEM, NC – April 27, 2021 — An intestinal bowel disease that affects up to 10 percent of premature infants at a very vulnerable and developmentally crucial time can lead to serious infection and death. Scientists at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) are tackling the disease with a human placental-derived stem cell (hPSC) therapy strategy that is showing promising results.

Necrotizing enterocolitis is a life-threatening intestinal disease that is a leading cause of mortality in premature infants and treatment options remain elusive. The cause of the disease is unclear – it is a multi-faceted disease that results from the complex interaction of early bacterial colonization, an exaggerated inflammatory response, and immature intestinal tissue. It occurs when the wall of the intestine is invaded by bacteria which cause infection and inflammation. Developing treatment approaches for this disease would improve both the survival outcomes and the health of these children who have their entire lifetime to protect.

Based on recent cell therapy studies, WFIRM scientists investigated the effect of a human placental-derived stem cell therapy on intestinal damage in a pre-clinical animal model. In 2007, WFIRM scientists were the first to identify and characterize stem cells derived from amniotic fluid and placenta. Stem cells offer great promise for new medical treatments to treat disease and injury.

To read the entire article, please click on the link below:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-04/wfbm-sct042721.php

 

Stem Cell Therapy, A New Multiple Sclerosis Breakthrough in 2021?

Stem cell therapy for MS

Stem cell therapy may be able to positively impact Multiple Sclerosis patients. Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to reduce inflammation and modulate the immune system, both of which may be extremely beneficial for MS patients.

Stem cell therapy, specifically the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for Multiple Sclerosis has demonstrated great potential to help improve symptoms and stabilize condition progression.  The immunomodulatory (ability to regulate the immune system), tissue-protective and repair-promoting properties of MSCs demonstrated in multiple models make them an attractive therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other conditions characterized by inflammation and/or tissue injury.

MS Patients may be able to expect an increase in energy, flexibility, strength, mobility, and control of basic function.  Data is also beginning the show that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) administered intravenously may have the ability to halt disease progression for an extended period.

To read the entire article, please click on the link below:

https://www.dvcstem.com/post/stem-cell-therapy-for-ms#:~:text=Blog%20%2F%20Stem%20Cells-,Stem%20Cell%20Therapy%2C%20A%20New%20Multiple%20Sclerosis%20Breakthrough%20in%202021,extremely%20beneficial%20for%20MS%20patients.

Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

 

A systematic review was performed by searching the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases up to July 2020 to identify human studies that assessed the clinical outcomes of isolated BMAC injection for the treatment of knee OA. The electronic search strategy used was “bone marrow aspirate concentrate knee osteoarthritis.”

Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, including a total of 299 knees with a mean follow-up of 12.9 months (range, 6-30 months). Of all patient-reported outcomes assessed across studies, 34 of 36 (94.4%) demonstrated significant improvement from baseline to latest follow-up (P < .05). Five studies evaluating numerical pain scores (visual analog scale and Numeric Rating Scale) reported significant improvements in pain level at final follow-up (P < .01). However, 3 comparative studies evaluating BMAC in relation to other therapeutic injections failed to demonstrate the clinical superiority of BMAC.

The BMAC injection is effective in improving pain and patient-reported outcomes in patients with knee OA at short- to midterm follow-up. Nevertheless, BMAC has not demonstrated clinical superiority in relation to other biologic therapies commonly used in the treatment of OA, including platelet-rich plasma and microfragmented adipose tissue, or in relation to placebo. The high cost of the BMAC injection in comparison with other biologic and nonoperative treatment modalities may limit its utility despite demonstrable clinical benefit.

 

Stem Cell Transplant Trial Enrolls First MS Patient in Minnesota.

A clinical trial investigating patient-derived stem cell transplants for the treatment of people with severe relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) has enrolled a patient in Minnesota.

The patient was enrolled at the University of Minnesota Medical School, one of two trial sites in the state. An additional 18 sites in the U.S. and one in the U.K. also are, or soon will be, recruiting participants for the BEAT-MS Phase 3 trial (NCT04047628). More information is available here.

The prevalence of MS is greater in Midwestern states than in the general U.S. population. It is estimated that “about 309 people [of] every 100,000 in the United States have MS, but in the Midwest, … we rank second in prevalence — the numbers increase to 353 people out of every 100,000 that are affected by this disease,” Flavia Nelson, MD, a professor of neurology and the study’s lead investigator, said in a press release.

More than a dozen disease-modifying therapies have been approved for the treatment of MS. However, in addition to their elevated costs, some of these therapies are not very effective at treating severe forms of relapsing MS. A stem cell transplant has been explored as a treatment alternative for MS patients who failed to respond to conventional disease-modifying therapies (DMT). By reseting the immune system so that the central nervous system is no longer attacked, this would provide a more effective and longer-lasting alternative to patients.

However, whether a stem cell transplant — also known as an autologous (patient-derived) hematopoietic stem cell transplant — is more effective than conventional disease-modifying therapies remains unclear. Their safety and costs also have not been compared.

To read the entire article, please click on the link below:

https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/news-posts/2021/06/11/first-patient-enrolled-minnesota-ms-stem-cell-transplant/

 

Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope!

 

 

One of the most dangerous complications of diabetes is a foot ulcer that won’t heal, but now a preliminary study finds that a type of stem cell found in body fat may be a powerful remedy for these severe foot wounds. Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope!

The study included 63 patients with non-healing diabetic foot ulcers who were given injections of cells from their own body fat. Over the next year, the treatment healed the ulcers in most patients. Researchers said the study — conducted in Nicaragua — lays the groundwork for a similar trial in the United States, to replicate the findings.

Diabetic foot ulcers are open sores or wounds that affect roughly 15% of people with diabetes, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). For some, the wounds refuse to heal and can become infected — sometimes leading to amputation.

In the United States alone, studies show that more than half of all amputations are diabetes-related — and non-healing foot ulcers are usually the reason why. People with diabetes are vulnerable to foot ulcers for several reasons, explained study author Dr. Michael Carstens.

To read the entire article, please click on the link below:

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-04-14/diabetes-can-lead-to-amputations-but-stem-cell-treatment-offers-hope