Stem Cell Therapy, A New Multiple Sclerosis Breakthrough in 2021?

Stem cell therapy for MS

Stem cell therapy may be able to positively impact Multiple Sclerosis patients. Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to reduce inflammation and modulate the immune system, both of which may be extremely beneficial for MS patients.

Stem cell therapy, specifically the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for Multiple Sclerosis has demonstrated great potential to help improve symptoms and stabilize condition progression.  The immunomodulatory (ability to regulate the immune system), tissue-protective and repair-promoting properties of MSCs demonstrated in multiple models make them an attractive therapy for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other conditions characterized by inflammation and/or tissue injury.

MS Patients may be able to expect an increase in energy, flexibility, strength, mobility, and control of basic function.  Data is also beginning the show that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) administered intravenously may have the ability to halt disease progression for an extended period.

To read the entire article, please click on the link below:

https://www.dvcstem.com/post/stem-cell-therapy-for-ms#:~:text=Blog%20%2F%20Stem%20Cells-,Stem%20Cell%20Therapy%2C%20A%20New%20Multiple%20Sclerosis%20Breakthrough%20in%202021,extremely%20beneficial%20for%20MS%20patients.

Stem Cell Transplant Trial Enrolls First MS Patient in Minnesota.

A clinical trial investigating patient-derived stem cell transplants for the treatment of people with severe relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) has enrolled a patient in Minnesota.

The patient was enrolled at the University of Minnesota Medical School, one of two trial sites in the state. An additional 18 sites in the U.S. and one in the U.K. also are, or soon will be, recruiting participants for the BEAT-MS Phase 3 trial (NCT04047628). More information is available here.

The prevalence of MS is greater in Midwestern states than in the general U.S. population. It is estimated that “about 309 people [of] every 100,000 in the United States have MS, but in the Midwest, … we rank second in prevalence — the numbers increase to 353 people out of every 100,000 that are affected by this disease,” Flavia Nelson, MD, a professor of neurology and the study’s lead investigator, said in a press release.

More than a dozen disease-modifying therapies have been approved for the treatment of MS. However, in addition to their elevated costs, some of these therapies are not very effective at treating severe forms of relapsing MS. A stem cell transplant has been explored as a treatment alternative for MS patients who failed to respond to conventional disease-modifying therapies (DMT). By reseting the immune system so that the central nervous system is no longer attacked, this would provide a more effective and longer-lasting alternative to patients.

However, whether a stem cell transplant — also known as an autologous (patient-derived) hematopoietic stem cell transplant — is more effective than conventional disease-modifying therapies remains unclear. Their safety and costs also have not been compared.

To read the entire article, please click on the link below:

https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/news-posts/2021/06/11/first-patient-enrolled-minnesota-ms-stem-cell-transplant/

 

Stem Cell Therapy for Patients With MS – A Randomized Study

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is at onset an immune-mediated demyelinating disease. In most cases, it starts as a relapsing-remitting disease with distinct attacks and no symptoms between flares. Over years or decades, virtually all cases transition into a progressive disease in which insidious and slow neurologic deterioration occurs with or without acute flares. Relapsing-remitting disease is often responsive to immune suppressive or modulating therapies, while immune based therapies are generally ineffective in patients with a progressive clinical course. This clinical course and response to immune suppression, as well as neuropathology and neuroimaging studies, suggest that disease progression is associated with axonal atrophy. Disability correlates better with measures of axonal atrophy than immune mediated demyelination. Therefore, immune based therapies, in order to be effective, need to be started early in the disease course while MS is predominately an immune-mediated and inflammatory disease. While current immune based therapies delay disability, no intervention has been proven to prevent progressive disability. We propose, as a randomized study, autologous unmanipulated PBSCT using a conditioning regimen of cyclophosphamide and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) versus FDA approved standard of care (i.e. interferon, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod, or tecfidera) in patients with inflammatory (relapsing) MS despite treatment with alternate approved therapy.

Check out the entire clinical trial on the link below:

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00273364

 

 

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